Speakers

Day 1:

The International Symposium presents the results of recent interdisciplinary research (geological, archaeological, palaeobotanical, archaeolozoological and paleontological) ctarried out in relation to the construction of the Maasvlakte 2 port extension into the North Sea near Rotterdam in the Netherlands.

Geology session

Keynote speaker:

Torbjörn Törnqvist is the Vokes Geology Professor in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Tulane Universisty. He received his degrees in Physical Geography from Utrecht University (MS: 1988, PhD: 1993), followed by a series of postdoctoral research appointments based in Utrecht and at Louisiana State University. In 1999, he became an Assistant Professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago, before joining Tulane University as an Associate Professor in 2005 and becoming a Professor in 2010. He is currently the Chair of the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Tulane. From 2006 to 2013, he served as the Director of the National Institute for Climatic Change Research Coastal Center, a US Department of Energy funding agency supporting basic research that aims to reduce the uncertainty about the future of coastal ecosystems nationwide due to climate and sea-level change.

Törnqvist’s research is funded, among others, by the US National Science Foundation. His work has appeared in leading journals, including Science and Nature Geoscience. His research interests revolve around the evolution of rivers, deltas, coasts, and shallow oceans in response to climate and sea-level change over timescales of centuries to the past few hundred thousand years. Current fieldwork by Törnqvist’s research group is focused on the Mississippi Delta and the adjacent US Gulf Coast. Several recent studies have drawn attention to connections between climate change and global sea-level change during the past ~8500 years. This includes climate episodes during the past millennium, such as the Medieval Warm Period and the Little Ice Age, plus an abrupt cooling that affected the Northern Hemisphere approximately 8200 years ago. These subjects currently receive great interest from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, in view of their relevance to predicting future climate and sea-level changes worldwide. Törnqvist’s research group also infers rates of coastal subsidence and its mechanisms, which constitute an enormous challenge for coastal Louisiana as well as other low-lying coastal regions around the globe. Finally, the sedimentary record of the Mississippi Delta is used to provide a framework for coastal restoration. This includes the analysis of marsh sustainability under variable rates of sea-level rise, plus studies of the evolution of landforms that serve as natural analogs for river diversions.
Abstract

Speakers:

Sytze van Heteren (PhD Boston University, USA) is a coastal and marine geologist at the Geological Survey of the Netherlands. For more than 25 years, he has conducted and supervised coastal projects in the Netherlands and in the USA. Key areas of expertise include biogeomorphology of shallow siliciclastic seas, coastal and marine sedimentology, coastal morphodynamics, and applied Quaternary geology. He has represented the Survey in various national and international research consortiums, coordinated the coastal-zone and shallow-marine mapping programme, analysed the impact of storm surges on coastal barriers, and helped to build bridges between marine geology, ecology and archaeology.
Abstract

Freek Busschers

Freek Busschers performed his PhD research on the development of the southern North Sea Rhine-Meuse system in relation to Middle and Late Pleistocene glacial, sea-level and climate change (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, 2008) and since then continued his work at TNO - Geological Survey of the Netherlands. His current research focuses on paleo landscape reconstruction of the southern North Sea area by combining state-of-the-art dating techniques with sedimentary, biostratigraphical and provenance analysis. A key component of his work is to process and interpret large amounts of archived boreholes and GIS map data by using 3D model and scripting techniques. Freek’s recent topics are the development of the Eemian Rhine delta, the imprint of glaciation on southern North Sea sedimentary history and the reconstruction of the palaeo landscape during the presence of hominids. For the Maasvlakte II project Freek carried out the sedimentary interpretation of the cores from the offshore sand pit. Preliminary results from this study will be presented at the symposium.
Abstract

Kim Cohen (1973) covers the fields of Palaeogeography, Quaternary Geology and Delta Sedimentology and has deployed various research activities in the Netherlands and the North Sea Basin. In 2003/2005 Kim first published on the particularities of the recording of the drowning of the Rhine valley at Rotterdam between 9000 and 8000 years ago in: the base of the delta and the break between middle and late Mesolithic. Kim has since maintained and expanded palaeogeographical reconstructions of the Lower Rhine and Southern North Sea regions, innovating information architecture solutions to bring shallow geological mapping into the 21th century. This produced basemaps that have become the national standard and are in wide use in applied and academic research, in the fields of civil engineering, river management, archeology, geology and physical geography. Internationally, Kim is known for his palaeogeographical research on the Southern North Sea at Pleistocene timescale and cross-overs to Palaeolithic archeology, for his work on fluvial archives at timescales of 100 to 100,000 years, for the Holocene sea-level and river history of the Rhine-Meuse delta. With his PhD students and postdocs, he has produced the sea-level curve and palaeogeographical reconstruction for Mesolithic Rotterdam and resolved the last-glacial palaeovalley onshore and offshore. With colleagues at Deltares, TNO and Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, he has produced prospective archeological maps for various parts of the delta, and participated in the Yangtzehaven project. Since 2008, Kim holds a research-lecturer position (Assistant Professor) at Utrecht University, sponsored by Deltares and TNO.
Abstract

Peter Vos

Peter Vos is a Senior geologist / physical geographer who graduated in 1980 from the Free University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
He works for Deltares (the former Rijks Geologische Dienst, / Netherlands Institute of Applied Geoscience TNO / TNO Built Enviroment and Geosciences).
Peter is a quaternary geologist, expert in Holocene coastal stratigraphy and palaeo-environmental reconstructions, he has ample experience in leading of geo-mapping programs, is a specialist in geoarchaeology; relation between landscape development, habitation history and human interference. He also is a specialist in palaeo-ecological diatom research. Peter has 30 years experience in participating in and leading of research projects He worked on the National palaeogeographic mapping program of the Netherlands and many large geoarcheological projects, e.g. the Yangtzehaven project – Maasvlakte.
Abstract

Dr. Laura I. Kooistra

Dr. Laura I. Kooistra Laura I. Kooistra graduated in 1985 at the University of Leiden with a Master of Science in biology with the specialization in palaeoethnobotany and palynology. Her current field of work and research is archaeobotany, palynology, palaeoecology and forensic botany. She is specialized in macro- and microfossil, wood and charcoal analysis. Laura is particularly interested in the relation between men and landscape in the past with much of her research committed to the (pre)history of agriculture, food economy and land use. In 1996 she defended her PhD dissertation at the University of Leiden. Her PhD study was focused on the possibilities and limitations of agriculture in the Kromme Rijn area (in the Netherlands) and in the loess region north of the Ardennes and the Eifel during the Roman Period and Early Middle Ages. Laura’s PhD work was supported by a research grant that she was awarded in 1989 by the Foundation for Archaeological Research (ARCHON), financed by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). Prior to her PhD study, she had worked on free-lance bases for the municipal archaeological services in 's-Gravenhage and Rotterdam. Between 1986 and 1989 she was working for the State Service for Archaeological Investigations in the Netherlands (ROB) in Amersfoort. Her research work was focused on botanical material from two archaeological sites in Voerendaal-Ten Hove and Houten-Tiellandt. In 1985 she completed wood and charcoal course in Eidgenössische Anstalt für das Forstliche Versuchswesen, Birmensdorf, Zwitserland lectured by Dr. W. Shoch and Prof. dr. F.H. Schweingruber. Between 1996 and 2002 she was a Secretary of the Dutch Association of Palynologists. Since 1996 she is associated with the Netherlands School of Archaeological Research (ARCHON). Since 1994 she is a partner in BIAX Consult.
Abstract

Archaeology session

Keynote speaker:

Nic Flemming first published on submerged prehistoric cave sites in 1962, and wrote his thesis on submerged Pleistocene caves and underwater cities in the Mediterranean. In 1967 he discovered the submerged Bronze Age town of Pavlopetri, and in 1981 the submerged Mesolithic site of Aghios Petros, in the Sporadhes. He has dived on submerged terrestrial archaeological sites offshore in about 20 countries. In 2002 he published with Bruno Werz on Palaeolithic Acheulean hand axes off the coast of South Africa. In 2004 he edited a book on the prehistory of the North Sea, and has co-edited a more recent book (2014) on a global selection of submerged prehistoric sites. He was active in the SPLASHCOS project, and was chairman of the SUBLAND WG of the EMB (2013-14). He is a research fellow at NOC, Southampton.
Abstract

Speakers:

Hans Peeters is a lecturer at the Groningen Institute of Archaeology, University of Groningen, and specialises in the archaeology of hunter-gatherers, wetland archaeology and prehistoric cultural landscapes. In his previous position as senior researcher at the Dutch Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands, he was involved in the development of the North Sea Prehistory Research and Management Framework (NSPRMF), as well as in the initial design of the research framework for Yangtze Port-Maasvlakte 2. He has played an active role in the EU-COST project Submerged Prehistoric Archaeology and Landscapes of the Continental Shelf (SPLASHCOS), and is currently involved in the development of a map of archaeological potential for the Dutch sector of the Continental Shelf. He is first author of the synthesis chapter of the report on the Yangtze port investigations.
Abstract

Lucy Kubiak-Martens is an archaeobotanist working as a senior researcher at BIAX Consult Biological Archaeology & Environmental Reconstruction, the Netherlands. Her current research interest is the reconstruction of hunter-gatherer and early agrarian subsistence economies in temperate Europe. She is particularly interested in patterns of use of wild plant food resources. She is specialised in plant macro-remains analysis and identification of charred archaeological parenchyma. Her work is increasingly focusing on SEM studies of organic residues encrusted on early ceramics and archaeological finds of processed plant food.
Abstract

Annemieke Verbaas is a co-author on the chapter on lithic finds of the Yangtze Port report. She studied archaeology at the Leiden University, where she received her MA in 2005. During her MA, she specialised in the use wear analysis of flint and stone tools and experimental archaeology. Since then, she has conducted use wear analysis on diverse flint, stone, antler and bone assemblages, published several articles and attended international meetings and workshops. At present, she works as a flint and stone specialist and use wear analyst for Stichting LAB, and as a teaching assistant at the Leiden University.

Marcel Niekus is a freelance archaeologist specialised in Stone Age research and has worked for BOOR on several occasions. His main interests are Mesolithic and Palaeolithic archaeology. He is co-author of the chapter on the lithic finds and the synthesis chapter of the Yangtze port report. He is currently involved in several projects on Mesolithic human remains from the Netherlands, including finds from the North Sea. Next year he will finish his PhD thesis on the Mesolithic occupation in the northern part of the Netherlands.
Abstract

Palaeontology session

Keynote speaker:

Jelle Reumer is director of the Natural History Museum in Rotterdam and professor of vertebrate palaeontology at Utrecht University. He studied biology and graduated in 1983 with a dissertation about fossil insectivores. He specialises in two completely different fields: from his position in Rotterdam he works on urban ecology, and as a palaeontologist he studies fossil mammals, with an emphasis on insectivores, mammoths and whales. In addition, he is active as a writer of scientific non-fiction and as a newspaper columnist.
Abstract

Speakers:

Matthijs (Thijs) van Kolfschoten studied geology and biology and is now Professor of Palaeozoology and Quaternary Biostratigraphy at the Faculty of Archaeology, Leiden University. His research focuses on continental faunal remains from Early Pleistocene-Early Holocene deposits, including the Maasvlakte fauna. His main research project is the study of the fossil record from Schöningen (Germany) in order to understand the late Middle Pleistocene climatic and faunal history as well as Lower Palaeolithic hominin behaviour and subsistence.
Abstract

Margot Kuitems studied Archaeology at the Faculty of Archaeology, Leiden University and during her undergraduate and graduate study she focussed on stable isotope research. The topic of her current PhD thesis is the application of stable isotopes (13C & 15N) in Eurasian fossil material. She had a coordinating role in the geo-archaeological and palaeontological research project that focused on the Maasvlakte 2 sand extraction area, and performed the taphonomical investigation on the bone material which had been dredged up by fishing trawls in that area.
Abstract

Natasja den Ouden is a palaeobiologist and archaeologist working at Naturalis Biodiversity Center where she manages the palaeontological collections. Apart from collection management, she is also involved in several research projects, public engagement and exhibition development. In addition to her work at Naturalis, Natasja is chairman of the WPZ, the Dutch Working Group for studying Pleistocene Mammals and editor in chief of Cranium, the journal published by the WPZ.
Abstract

Dimitri De Loecker studied Prehistoric Archaeology at Leiden University (The Netherlands). He graduated (MS) in 1988 and received a PhD degrees in 2006. As an archaeologist his main interests are on the material culture of Lower and Middle Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers. His key areas of expertise include: lithic typo-/technological studies, spatial and refitting analyses on lithic artefact assemblages and taphonomical investigations. For more than 25 years, he participated and co-supervised several national and international interdisciplinary research projects. These archaeological assignments were both on commercial, as well as on academic level, e.g. the Middle Palaeolithic Maastricht-Belvédère project (The Netherlands), the Lower Palaeolithic Boxgrove project (United Kingdom), the ´Maaswerken´ Project (The Netherlands) and the Middle Palaeolithic Neumark-Nord Project (East Germany). Since 2008 Dimitri is involved in the archaeology of the submerged North Sea basin. Together with a team from Wessex Archaeology (United Kingdom) he analysed and published the archaeology and palaeogeography of Area 240: an Early Middle Palaeolithic hand axe assemblage which was dredged from the North Sea bottom near the coast of great Yarmouth (Norfolk, United Kingdom). In addition, he was also involved in the archaeological Maasvlakte 2 project (Rotterdam, The Netherlands), which studies flooded Landscapes beneath the North Sea. During this research assignment he had an active role in the survey, analysis and reporting phases. He is (co-)author of several chapters on the recovered finds and contributed to the synthesis chapter of the Maasvlakte 2 report.

Frank Wesselingh has been a lifelong collector of fossil shells from Dutch beaches. After studying geology at VU University Amsterdam he became curator at Naturalis Biodiversity Center in Leiden and engaged in a PhD thesis at the biology faculty of Turku University, Finland. Frank studies landscape development and biodiversity change from fossil molluscs. He is interested in taxonomy, palaeoecology, geochemistry and biodiversity. In the past he worked in the Amazon region, Indonesia and the North Sea Basin. Since 1999, Frank has been working with a broad group of professionals and amateurs on fossil shells from the Dutch coast (resulting in a first book in 2010) and is also involved in various projects in the North Sea Basin based on borehole material. Frank is currently a researcher at Naturalis and is leading “Drivers of Ponto-Caspian Biodiversity: Rise and Demise”, a Marie Curie Initial Training Network.
Abstract

Bjørn Smit Ministry of Education, Culture and Science, Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands. Bjørn is a senior researcher working at the Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands. He specializes in the archaeology of early prehistory within the context of archaeological heritage management. His PhD research focused on research methods for the research of hunter gatherer remains in the northern parts of the Netherlands. During the research of the MV2 investigations he had an active role in the design of the research strategies and guided and advised in the subsequent research and reporting phases.
Abstract

Day 2: Complex project

Tiedo Vellinga Port of Rotterdam, Maasvlakte 2, obtained his degree in Civil Engineering (coastal engineering) at the Delft Universityof Technology in 1979. Since then he has been working for the Port of RotterdamAuthority in the field of infrastructureand water management. Currently, he isProfessor Ports and Waterways at Delft University of Technology, Director Environmental Monitoring Maasvlakte 2 and project leader for the development and implementation of the Environmental Ship Index, a World Ports Climate Initiative.He is an expert on port environmental management and sediment management.

Andrea Otte is a senior policy advisor at Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands. She has a background in Roman Archaeology of North Western Europe. Since 2002 she has been involved in Maritime and Underwater Archaeology advising stakeholders, such as the Port Authority of Rotterdam, on dealing responsibly with the underwater cultural heritage during development projects. She is currently involved in the governmental investigation of the UNESCO Convention for the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage.

Mark Moens Contrator Maasvlakte 2, PUMA.
Could not attend, replaced by Wil Borst (POR).

Bob Hoogendoorn

Bob Hoogendoorn (Rotterdam, 1971) studied earth sciences in Amsterdam. After his studies, he worked for 3 years in the field of financial risk management, including 1 year in Paris. In 2000 he returned to earth sciences, by starting a PhD at the Technical University of Delft, studying the effect of sediment supply and sea-level change on the stratigraphy of deltas in the Caspian Sea region. After completing his PhD he worked at the TU Delft at the department of geo-engineering as an Assistant Professor. During this period he continued his work on Deltas and sea level change. He was the initiator of the project Spiegelzee (2007), a public campaign in which effects of sea level change on the Dutch coast was explained in a pavilion on the beach of Katwijk. In 2010 Bob moved to Deltares, where he leads the Department of Applied Geology and Geophysics. In addition to the responsibility for this department, he is directly involved in a number of complex projects in the Netherlands and abroad , including the Yangtzehaven project. He is a board member of the European Federation of Geologists (EFG).

Dimitri Schiltmans works as an archaeologist for the Municipality of Rotterdam (Bureau Oudheidkundig Onderzoek Rotterdam, or BOOR). He specialises in core analysis, late Pleistocene and early Holocene landscapes, and the archaeology of prehistoric groups within those landscapes. He acted as general project director of the last two stages of the Yangtze port project. These stages included the underwater excavations of the project. He is currently researching another drowned river-dune landscape located at the Princess Alexia port within the Maasvlakte 2 area. 

Photo by Johan Tempelaar

Joep Stassen (1966) calls himself a Corporate Comedian. As an entertainer and moderator he animates business events and symposia. He adds value to each event in his own, special way. He understands the dynamics of group meetings and the power of joy and sharing and helps to unfold complicated and hidden issues.